HS Course Descriptions

  

Department

Title

Description

Bible New Testament Survey A complete and concise survey of the writings of the New Testament, including the Gospels, Acts, and the Epistles. Primarily for freshman.
World Religions This sophomore course is to help students understand the religions of the world. Students will be able to compare and contrast anti-Christian religions to the truth of Christianity.
Theology The goal of the course is for students to understand ethical, doctrinal beliefs, and the context of God’s word. Primarily for juniors.
Biblical Communications This senior course is to help students with public speaking, develop the art of listening, create a proper testimony, and lead a devotional.
English Literature/Composition I This course serves as a thorough survey of introductory literature arranged by genre. Students will be exposed to short stories, dramatic literature, the novella, the novel, and the epic. Extensive written and oral communication are developed and practiced, and usage and mechanics are reinforced through the study of both expository and persuasive writing.
Literature/Composition II A survey of world literature presented in a historical context emphasizing critically reading, analyzing, and responding to literature. Grammar, composition, and vocabulary are integrated.
Literature/Composition II-Honors An Honors class parallels the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular class, but may cover additional topics or some topics in greater depth. Due to the rigorous nature of Honors classes, the school awards a weighted grade point for these classes.
Literature/Composition III A chronological study of American literature covering the birth of the nation to the present. Through these readings students will improve their own writing developing their analytical as well as creative writing skills. Grammar and vocabulary is integrated.
Literature/Composition III-Honors/AP An Honors class parallels the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular class, but may cover additional topics or some topics in greater depth. Due to the rigorous nature of Honors and AP classes, the school awards a weighted grade point for these classes. Students of this class will be given the opportunity to take the AP exam for English Language and Composition.
Literature/Composition IV This course is a chronological study of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon age to modernity. Analytical and critical thinking skills are developed through both expository and persuasive writing. Students are introduced to the thesis-based research paper, and are challenged to begin writing and reading on a solid college preparatory level.
Literature/Composition IV-Honors/AP An Honors class parallels the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular class, but may cover additional topics or some topics in greater depth. Due to the rigorous nature of Honors and AP classes, the school awards a weighted grade point for these classes. Students of this class will be given the opportunity to take the AP exam for English Literature and Composition.
Critical Reading & Writing I (Dual Enrollment) This course is a dual enrollment course taken through Georgia State’s Accel Program at Atlanta Christian College. This course, along with Critical Reading & Writing II can replace either American Literature or British Literature as a high school graduation requirement and provide college credit for Eng 101 & 102. Student must meet admission requirements for ACC and provide transportation between campuses.
Critical Reading & Writing II (Dual Enrollment) This course is a dual enrollment course taken through Georgia State’s Accel Program at Atlanta Christian College. This course, along with Critical Reading & Writing I in the first semester can replace either American Literature or British Literature as a high school graduation requirement and provide college credit for Eng 101 & 102. Student must meet admission requirements for ACC and provide transportation between campuses.
Mathematics Algebra I Algebra 1 covers all topics in a first-year algebra course, from proofs, statistics and probability to algebra-based real-world problems. With Algebra 1, students begin developing the more complex and understanding required for advanced mathematics.
Algebra II Algebra 2 covers all topics that are traditionally covered in second-year algebra as well as a considerable amount of geometry. In fact, students completing Algebra 2 will have studied the equivalent of one semester of informal geometry. Ample time is spent developing geometric concepts and writing proof outlines. Real-world problems are included along with applications to other subjects such as physics and chemistry.
Geom-Trig-AlgIII Advanced Mathematics fully integrates topics from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Word problems are developed throughout the problem sets and become progressively more elaborate. With regular practice, high-school level students will be able to solve challenging problems such as rate problems and problems involving abstract quantities. Conceptually oriented problems help prepare students for college entrance exams such as the ACT and SAT.
Geom-Trig-AlgIII-PreCalc-Honors Advanced Mathematics fully integrates topics from algebra, geometry, trigonometry and pre-calculus. Word problems are developed throughout the problem sets and become progressively more elaborate. With regular practice, high-school level students will be able to solve challenging problems such as rate problems and problems involving abstract quantities. Conceptually oriented problems help prepare students for college entrance exams such as the ACT and SAT. Due to the fact that this course combines Geom-Trig-AlgIII with Pre-Calc and progresses at a very fast pace, it is only available for very strong math students in our junior and senior class.
Pre-Calculus This is a course of study of all the mathematics necessary for success in a Calculus class, including probability, statistics, series and sequences, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, vectors, rectangular and polar coordinates, and matrices and determinants.
AP Calculus I Calculus is designed for prospective mathematics majors and students interested in engineering, computer science, physics, business or the life sciences. Instruction takes full advantage of graphing calculators, using them for visual demonstrations of concepts and confirming calculations. Students of this class will take the AP Exam for Calculus AB.
Geometry Geometry includes all topics in a high school geometry course, including perspective, space, and dimension associated with practical and axiomatic geometry. Students learn how to apply and calculate measurements of lengths, heights, circumference, areas, and volumes. Geometry introduces trigonometry and allows students to work with transformations. Students will use logic to create proofs and constructions and will work with key geometry theorems and proofs.
Science General Biology Required of 9th grade students. This is an introductory course in which students study the fundamental concepts of Biology. The unity and diversity of life are emphasized through the studies of cells, the chemistry of life, classification, genetics, ecology, and the structure and function of all life forms from bacteria to man.
Honors Biology Required of 9th grade students; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II; Department Approval. Biology is the study of living things. The goal of biology is to gain a better understanding of living organisms, how they work, and how they interact with their environment. Through study, students will learn and apply basic concepts and assumptions to describe a broad range of phenomena in the world of living things. Our studies in this course will include a comprehensive look at cells, heredity, ecology, and taxonomy. As an honors course, we will emphasize a strong laboratory component with intensive writing analysis as well as cover information in greater depth than the regular course.
General Chemistry Required to graduate; completion of biology; concurrent enrollment in Advanced Math. This traditional course in chemistry uses experimentation, observation, and problem solving to reinforce a study of atomic theory, bonding, chemical periodicity, metric measurement, chemical reactions, and the primary states of matter. Students use mathematical skills to analyze and synthesize quantitative data and to solve problems in chemistry. Emphasis is also placed on developing problem solving skills, a disciplined approach to study, and skills in writing reports through the critical thinking and analytical reasoning required in the scientific method. An important aspect of this work is learning to apply safety skills and the ability to work in groups. Students must submit lab reports and are responsible for keeping up with assignments.
Honors Chemistry Required to graduate, completion of biology, concurrent enrollment in Advanced Math; Department Approval. This course provides comprehensive coverage of principles of general chemistry. It differs from the regular chemistry course in that more topics are covered, the topics are covered in greater depth, and a more quantitative approach is followed. In this laboratory-based course, students will explore topics covered in general chemistry with additional work in thermochemistry, thermodynamics, and nuclear chemistry. Students who perform well in this course may be eligible to take AP Chemistry.
AP Chemistry Previous course in chemistry; Department Approval. Students who have already completed an introductory chemistry course learn and apply the basic principles, concepts, and operations of college chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, bonding, periodicity, acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Students explore concepts through several laboratory investigations and are required to maintain a laboratory notebook and a use a scientific calculator to solve problems. The course requires extensive home preparation that must be done nightly. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May.
General Physics Required to graduate; completion of biology. This class is an introduction to the principles of physics. Emphasis is placed on learning and understanding in a conceptual process as well as solution of problems using geometric methods. Students conduct laboratory investigations and explore the process of collecting and analyzing their data and representing it in a lab report.
Honors Physics Required to graduate; completion of biology and chemistry; concurrent enrollment in a Calculus Course; Department Approval. This class is an introductory college preparatory course in physics. Emphasis is placed on learning and understanding the principles and concepts of physics as well as the solution of problems. Students apply these concepts in laboratory activities and are required to write detailed lab reports. Students are also required to use their skills and understanding in Trigonometry, Calculus, vector analysis, and graphing in their problem solving, so Pre-Calculus is a recommended prerequisite for this course. Students who perform well in this course may be eligible to take AP Physics.
AP Physics Previous course in Physics; concurrent enrollment in a Calculus Course; Department Approval. Students who have already completed an introductory physics course may take Advanced Placement Physics (B is the typical test, but C-Mechanics is an option). This course covers a broad range of physics principles with an emphasis on problem solving and an insight to real-world applications. Topics in classical and 20th century phsys8ics include mechanics, thermodynamics, vibrations and waves, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and modern physics. The class assumes prior knowledge of trigonometry and ability to apply calculus principles to problem solving. Students participate in lab activities and write detailed lab reports. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May.
Anatomy Completion of Biology; Offered to 10th – 12th grade with Department Approval. The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the structure and functions of the human body. Students begin their study with the chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization of the human body before learning the various body systems. Students work cooperatively in lab groups and are required to keep a journal. Microscopes and prepared slides are used to investigate histology. Laboratory work does include limited dissections.
Environmental Science Completion of Biology; Offered to 10th – 12th grade with Department Approval. This course provides students with the scientific principles and concepts that enable them to understand the earth’s interconnected systems, to identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and manmade, and to evaluate the risks associated with these problems. Students are required to do a substantial amount of laboratory work, some of which is field-related with focus on student data collection and analysis. The major topics to be emphasized include flow of energy and cycling of matter, interconnection of all life, the stability and change in an ecosystem, conversation and resource allocation, and evaluation of human activity and technology.
Forensic Science Completion of Biology and Chemistry; Department Approval. This course will provide students with an introduction to the theoretical understanding and practical application of forensic science techniques including forensic DNA typing, bloodstain pattern analysis, forensic entomology, forensic toxicology, drugs and poisons, forensic anthropology, crime scene investigations, fingerprinting, document examination, evidence collection and examination, ballistics, understanding of the relationship between forensic science and legal studies, and career opportunities in forensics. The class is designed around authentic performance assessments with students working in teams to solve crimes using scientific knowledge, skills, and reasoning. Students interested in taking two science courses in an academic year may do so with departmental approval. If your student is interested in such a scenario, please contact your student’s science teacher or the Science Department Chair, Virginia Detty, virginia.detty@tcslions.org via email at to discuss the matter.
Social Studies Civics Prepares students for responsible citizenship with a discussion of the principles and mechanics of a constitutional republic.
World History This course covers historical events from ancient to modern times. Discussions of politics, economics, science, fine arts and church history are included.
World History Honors An Honors class parallels the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular class, but may cover additional topics or some topics in greater depth. Due to the rigorous nature of Honors classes, the school awards a weighted grade point for these classes.
US History This course is a comprehensive survey of the history of our nation. It focuses on the causes of events, the strains on the Union, and the underlying issues that have shaped the United States.
US History-Honors An Honors class parallels the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular class, but may cover additional topics or some topics in greater depth. Due to the rigorous nature of Honors classes, the school awards a weighted grade point for these classes. Students of this class may be given the opportunity to take the AP exam for US History.
Economics Leads students through an investigation of how basic economic principles work at home, in businesses, in financial markets, and in government. This course stresses free-market ideals and Christian economic values.
Foreign Language French I Guides students into French culture and enables them to engage in simple conversation. Forms a basis for continuing education in French 2 and 3.
French II French 2 students will develop expanded vocabulary and reading skills.
French III French 3 reviews and builds on the grammar and vocabulary previously taught to enhance conversational, reading, listening, and writing skills. Students study compound verb tenses and the subjunctive and passive moods. They focus on French history, geography, industry, daily life, fine arts, and famous scientists.
Spanish I This course will educate students in real-life language and proper grammar with reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities. The material covers culture and history as well.
Spanish II Students will learn to communicate at an intermediate level. They will get an overview of grammatical structure and learn Scripture passages.
Spanish III This course will further develop student’s mastery of vocabulary, oral communication skills, and grammatical structure with a special focus on verb forms.
Physical Education Health Provides students with an understanding of the basic needs of the human body. Help them learn how to care for themselves physically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually.
Physical Education The focus of high school physical fitness is on the development of long-term habits that lead to a healthy and fit adult lifestyle.
Life Fitness This course is designed to help high school students take responsibility for their own activity, fitness, and health and to prepare them for an active and healthy life.
Fine Arts Chorus This is a performance based course in which the students will perform a variety of singing styles. They will learn singing fundamentals and performance techniques.
Concert Band The Trinity Christian School Band program will help to cultivate individual musicianship skills (concerning music theory and instrumental technique) as well as overall ensemble performance. The band is a special organization that, because of its very nature, gives individuals an opportunity to work together in order for the group to perform at their very best. Not only does this course teach teamwork, it is designed to provide the student a love and understanding of all types of music by learning to perform the best of the available band literature.
Drama Drama is an overview of theatre covering the basic techniques necessary for dramatic activities. In-class activities include mastering interpretation, analyzing play structure and character development, theater production, rehearsal, memorized performances, theatre games and exercises, and improvisation. Drama is considered a fine arts credit.
Ensemble Ensemble (Praise Band) is a performance based class that will help develop praise and worship leaders by identifying the responsibility involved in such a title. It will provide opportunity for students to perform at various events throughout the year and for leading worship in chapel. It requires at least one year of experience on an instrument and admittance is by audition only.
Music Appreciation I Music Appreciation is a survey of musical style periods, Renaissance through Contemporary. Representative composers and music from each period are listened to, discussed, and compared. This course is beneficial to future college students when filling their fine arts requirement.
Music Theory I Through this course of study, students will learn the fundamentals of music notation. Students will analyze, synthesize, and create music with an understanding of the various notation techniques.
Visual Art I This high school class provides basic art skills, an introduction to art history, and studio production. The students explore the elements of design, realism drawing, color theory, positive and negative images, and symmetry.
Visual Art II This art class is an expansion of the skills learned in Visual Arts I and explores the principles of design and art history. The students express themselves through mixed media projects, drawing techniques of perspective, and wet medium.
Visual Art III-Photography Visual Arts III is an upper level art class, concentrating in the medium of photography. The students will learn the elements of composition, presentation, themed work, and the various roles of photography.
Visual Art IV-3D Visual Arts IV is an upper level art class, concentrating in 3-D design. The students will study art history as it relates to architecture and sculpture. Hands-on experience will include designing and constructing 3-D models, masks, freestanding mobiles, and cityscapes.
Other Electives Computer Applications I Our high school Computer Applications I course is designed to help students develop skill in the areas of word processing, desktop publishing, and internet research strategies and uses. Emphasis is placed on skill development and refinement as well as the inherent ethical and social issues that arise from the use of technology. The student will find that the skills learned in this class will be a benefit throughout their high school, college and professional career.
College Writing This course was designed with college-bound seniors in mind. We will endeavor to introduce students to the practices, habits, conventions and skills of college literacy.
Graphic Design/Yearbook This class creates Trinity’s yearbook. Students develop skills in a wide variety of areas, including planning, layout, production, digital photography, digital imaging, graphic design, advertising, sales, and marketing. This is a limited class and interested students must apply to the teacher for entrance.
Humanities This survey course closely examines what it means to be human and to create. Through examination and analysis of art, architecture, literature, philosophy, and music, students explore the varied definitions of humanity as suggested by the major civilizations of the Western world.
Life Skills In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn skills in the areas of food and nutrition, childcare and safety, interior design, clothing, consumerism, family relationships, and personal responsibility.
Personal Finance Students learn a variety of money management skills they can use now and throughout their lives. They learn to create a budget, use a checkbook, manage savings and investments, complete tax forms, take out loans, build their dream home, and use credit wisely.
Psychology This course is an introduction to the study of human thought and behavior. Students will explore the major approaches to psychology and the history of scientific research in this field. Topics include human development, sensation and perception, learning and memory, consciousness, personality, psychopathology, therapeutic approaches, and social psychology.
Speech This course is designed to help students effectively communicate within a social and professional setting. They will develop an understanding of the communication skills needed for successful participation in group interactions and individual presentations. Students will prepare and give presentations for formal and informal situations.
World Geography In this class, students will study the earth, its people, and its resources as God created them.
Writer’s Workshop Writer’s Workshop is a creative writing course in which students are taught to compose short stories, original poetry, plays, essays, critical reviews, and humorous prose. The class will be taught through discussions, small group activities and individualized writing assignments.